5* Antigua, Martinique, St Kitts and more

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Enjoy a 10 Night cruise to some of the most beautiful islands of the Caribbean on the 5* Crown Princess. Departing Fort Lauderdale in Florida this cruise also visits Antigua, Martinique, Barbados, St Kitts, St Thomas in the US Virgin Islands and Grand Turk in Turks & Caicos. Price includes 1 night in a 4* hotel in Miami before your cruise.

10 night cruise for the price of 7 nights

Itinerary

Day 1 Miami, Florida, USA

Following your flight from Dublin, you will be transferred to a hotel in Miami for your one night stay giving you a chance to relax on the famous beaches or explore this lively city.

Adjectives such as glitzy and glamorous and fun and funky only hint at the reason Miami’s a world-renowned international destination. In the 500 years since Ponce de León arrived in search of the elusive fountain of youth, people have flocked here to capture the city’s energy, vitality and alluring charms. While the city’s noted for its towering palm trees, glittering blue ocean vistas and pristine beaches, beautiful weather, beautiful places and beautiful people it’s also home to an intriguing history, lively culture and postcard-perfect architecture. From the “walking trees” and ‘gator spotting in the Everglades to celebrity spotting in South Beach, Miami’s sure to impress.

Day 2 Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Following your overnight in Miami, you will be transferred to the port in Ft. Lauderdale to board the magnificent 5* Crown Princess. According to the popular 1960 beach movie, Fort Lauderdale is “where the boys are.” The city’s reputation as America’s Spring Break capital, however, has been replaced with the more favorable image of a prime family tourist destination, attracting more than 10 million visitors annually. The most popular beach resort in Florida is even more rightly famed as the “Yachting Capital of the World,” with more than 40,000 registered crafts calling its waters home. The city also prides itself on being the “Venice of America” with more than 300 miles of navigable waterways. Fort Lauderdale boasts world-class theaters, museums, sightseeing, and shopping. The city sits 24 miles north of Miami and is named after a series of forts built by the United States during the second Seminole War. The forts took their name from Major William Lauderdale, who was the commander of the detachment of soldiers who built the first fort. Look hard and you might find remnants of three of them today. More people seem to be interested in taking a water tour aboard the “Carrie B.”

Day 3-4 At Sea

Cruising.

Day 5 Antigua

he largest of the British Leeward Islands, Antigua (pronounced an-tee-ga) boasts one of the Caribbean’s most spectacular coastlines with secluded coves and sun-drenched beaches. The island’s rolling hills are dotted with stone sugar mills, relics from the bygone era when sugar was king. Historic Nelson’s Dockyard, where Admiral Horatio Nelson quartered his fleet in 1784, attests to Antigua’s long and colorful nautical history during colonial times. And St. John’s, the island’s bustling capital, offers visitors a wealth of boutiques, restaurants and pubs.

Day 6 Martinique

To the Arawak, Martinique was their treasured “isle of flowers.” Lying in the Lesser Antilles between Dominica and St. Lucia, the island is a tropical paradise of dense rain forest, rolling savanna and stunning beaches. The rich volcanic soil nourishes banana plantations and pineapple fields as well as mangoes, papayas, lemons, limes, and West Indian cherries. Little wonder that Columbus praised Martinique as the “best, most fertile, most delightful, and most charming land in the world.” Martinique’s cultural heritage is as rich and bountiful as its soil. The island has been governed by France for over three centuries. Today an overseas department of France, the island boasts a culture that is a unique and zesty blend of French, Caribbean, African and Middle Eastern influences, resulting in that spicy combination called Créole. Créole culture is reflected in Martinique’s architecture, cuisine, language, and music. For years the mayor of Fort-de-France was the internationally acclaimed Créole poet Aimé Césaire. Five centuries after Columbus made his landfall, Martinique remains a rare flower in the Caribbean.

Day 7 Barbados

Barbados is one of the few Caribbean islands solely colonized by one nation. It’s no wonder Bajans describe their country as being “more English than England sheself,” surnames like Worthing and Hastings abound. But look around and you know you’re not in England: rich and fertile tropical fields meet a glistening, azure sea. The soft pastels of old chattel houses blend with the vibrant reds, oranges, and greens of roadside fruit stands. In short, Barbados exudes a charm all its own. Perhaps it is due to Bajan culture, that celebrated blend of English tradition and the African heritage brought to the island by slaves imported to work the sugar plantations. The potent brew which results flavors every aspect of island life, from music, dance and art, to religion, language and food.

Day 8 St. Kitts

Jagged volcanoes soaring above azure and turquoise seas, dense rainforests in myriad shades of green, rolling fields of sugarcane–welcome to St. Kitts. Along with its neighbor, Nevis, St. Kitts presents an exotic landscape more common to Polynesia than the Caribbean. The islands’ terrain, rich soil, and climate made them ideal locations for raising sugarcane. In fact, St. Kitts and Nevis were once the crown jewels of the Caribbean. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Spain, France and England vied for control of the islands, with the English finally winning out in 1787. Today, British and French heritage is evident on both islands. Basseterre, the capital of St. Kitts, boasts fine, restored colonial buildings. Impressive Brimstone Hill Fortress, called the “Gibraltar of the West Indies,” is one of the most impressive fortresses in the Caribbean.

Day 9 St Thomas, US Virgin Islands

The US Virgin Islands are America’s paradise, offering an easygoing blend of island ways and American practicality. St. Thomas, capital of the island group, offers every imaginable sport: snorkeling, golfing, hiking, and sailing. Just a few miles away lay St. John and Virgin Islands National Park. Stunning mountain scenery, crystalline waters, and white-sand beaches with palms swaying in the breeze – the US Virgin Islands are truly a slice of paradise. The harbor is easily one of the Caribbean’s most scenic. The United States purchased the Virgin Islands from Denmark for $25 million in gold. St. Thomas has a reputation as a duty free-mecca for shopping.

Day 10 Grand Turk, Turks & Caicos

Grand Turk, the capital of the Turks and Caicos Islands, is a small island bursting with turn-of-the-century Caribbean charm, retaining the look and feel of the Caribbean 40 years ago. Grand Turk was founded by Bermudan salt rakers some three centuries ago and its Bermudan-British-colonial architecture surrounded by colorful local dwellings make the island a treasure to visit. It is recognized as being one of the first places in the New World where Christopher Columbus landed and also gained worldwide attention when John Glenn splashed down near Grand Turk on his historic first mission to space. Grand Turk is six miles long and just over a mile wide with a population of only 6,000. It is blessed with miles of uncrowded, beautiful beaches and is close to several uninhabited cays such as Gibb’s Cay, home of the stingray encounter. While there are many landside attractions to explore such as the Old Prison, Lighthouse Park, and the re-created salt salina, the real beauty of the island lies underwater. Grand Turk is world-famous for its healthy and beautiful coral reefs that surround the island, stretching almost from the coastline to the 7,000-foot vertical wall just offshore.

Day 11 At Sea

Cruising.

Accommodation

Crown Princess

Enjoy sweeping views of the world while sailing on Crown Princess. From her nearly 900 balconies to the breathtaking three-story Atrium, you’ll discover a relaxing atmosphere filled with an array of world class entertainment and dining options that will greet you each day when you return from making fascinating discoveries ashore.

  • Last Refurbished: November 2011
  • Guest Capacity: 3,080 lower berths
  • Number of Crew: 1,200
  • Tonnage: 113,561

Extra Information

Booking remarks

  • Inclusive of taxes and service charges as indicated
  • Non-refundable deposit of €250 per person
  • Optional Insurance available (call for details)
  • Child and family prices available on request
  • These prices are guidelines only and are subject to change and availability. Pricing will be confirmed at time of booking.

  Cost per person: €1,579pp
  Number of nights: 11

16 November 2018 €1,579 Inside Stateroom
16 November 2018 €1,779 Oceanview Stateroom
16 November 2018 €1,839 Balcony Stateroom

Tour supplied in Partnership with:

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  Call:  (01) 294 1000